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Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
, in chicago, detroit, philadelphia, and all over this nation, the black masses are on the march for jobs and freedom. >> in the five decades since, john lewis has become an icon of the civil rights movement, a hero who faced down brutal southern police in the name of freedom and was beaten bloody for daring to do so. today, he is a 14-term congressman from georgia. recently, he and i returned to the national mall in washington to remember that day in 1963 and the march that changed america. >> people were all the way down. and you just saw hundreds and thousands of individuals. i'm john lewis, and i was the youngest speaker. ten of us spoke. i spoke number six. dr. king spoke number ten. and out of the ten people that spoke that day, i'm the only one still around. >> congratulations. >> what's that? >> congratulations. >> thank you very much. >> it was a great moment in american life. >> you were his friend? >> yeah. i got to know dr. king. i met him in 1958 when i was 18. but i first heard of him when i was 15 years old in the 10th grade. we worked together. we marched together. we got
elements. if you look at his speeches from birmingham, wrik wrigly field, cleveland, chicago, detroit, i have a dream and the march on washington is really a culminationef a series of interracial fest valz that summer in which all the elements, many from letters from a birmingham jail-- are reshuffled. when you see the continuities of "i have a dream" even the drea dream-- and king always believed before there was an american dream-- he used to preach this all the time it's slaves had their own dreams. and keep in mind here, doesn't end with the declaration. it's a black man. black slaefs have the last word when he has whites become blacks so we can all experience bondage and deliverance. always conflicted when you look at king's brilliant mixing to miss these other strains of black pride and rebeaut of america. one day, the national will live out, not now. >> rose: clawrns, how did he end up being the last speaker? >> there was a proposal, 10 speers, and each speaker would be allocated five minute. and the proposal was dr. king would be in the middle, that he would be like the fifth or
of detroit in the throws of bankruptcy and countless other cities teetering on the brink, there is a fierce urgency to act now. if the big auto makers and major financial institutions were too big and too important to fail, why is not the same true of the major urban centers which are populated by millions of poor blacks and brown and white hungering for nothing more than a decent job to provide for themselves and their families? why shouldn't historically black colleges and universities desperate for stability be given the assistance which will enable them to continue their noble mission of educating both the best, brightest, as well as the least of these? as we struggle to recover from the worst economic calamity since the great depression, america needs a new marshall plan for our cities to provide jobs, infrastructure improvements, and a true lasting stimulus to the economy. while we are inspired today by the majesty of power of my father's exhortation of yesterday year we must be mindful of this imperative of love. he sought the beloved community where we could live together with peace
't have to look any more at greece and portugal. we can look close by at detroit . folks, that is a picture of where liberal progressive ideas go. detroit was america's premier city. highest per capita income in the country. proud of our country and the auto business there. but then as you had government unions grow and higher taxes, and more regulation, as you saw these liberal progressive ideas that were supposed to help the poor and build a middle class, what have we been left with in detroit? for minorities and the poor? unemployment, about 40%. has it helped children get a better education? only 7% of children in the eighth grade read at the grade level. has it created the prosperity that they talk about when a third of the buildings are empty, where you've got 400ly quor stores and until a few weeks ago not one chain super market in what was america's premier city. folks, it's not a theatrical argument any more. and the states of california and illinois and other states following that policy are not far behind in some form of bankruptcy. our ideas are being show cas
are bailed out. detroit is in bankruptcy. we're paying an awful price for the intervention in iraq. said it leads to a moral and spiritual bankruptcy. when he was killed, the values and standards went up. of theeaming constitutional right to vote. keep dreaming about the war on poverty. choose schools over gills. keep dreaming of student loan forgiveness. keep dreaming. to restoreng foreclosed housing. keep dreaming of immigration reform that includes africa, haiti, and the caribbean. keep dreaming. we're free but not equal. keep dreaming. choose life over death. graduations and los feliz. keep the faith. keep hope alive though. -- keep hope alive. the lord is our life. >> ♪ >> our next speaker is is an attorney, president of the national bar association, president of the washington bar christiann, and the product company. >> we must stand an hour ground for justice. we must stand our ground for justice. on behalf of the national bar association, the nation's oldest and largest bar association of attorneys of color, founded in 1925, i am honored to be here today. for the last 88 years,
mother understood that we lived in the north in detroit michigan, where i live now. she and i knew, from reading different obligations, like jet , about newspaper different disturbances in the south. remember seeing the picture of major adverse, after he had been killed -- medger evers after he had been killed. i went to integrated schools and lived in a integrated neighborhood. my friends were white and black, all through school. it disturbs my mother and me that people in the south had problems and could not live the life that i lived. they went to lunch counters and took public transportation. we would get on the bus. ride wherever we need to go and sat wherever we want to set. -- sit. coming to the march meant supporting the travesties that were happening in the south. just my mother and i. 250,000 people felt the same way. many who watched from their tvs and homes. it felt the same way and could not get there. thatew and understood america is a democracy and they're supposed to be freedom. there is not freedom. we have to unite and stand together as a child, i was 12 .ears old you c
detroit, michigan, which is where i live now, but she knew and i knew from reading different publications like "jet." our black newspaper was then called "the michigan chronicle." i remember vividly seeing the picture of mr. evers after he had been killed. but growing up in the north, in detroit, i lived the dream that dr. king spoke of. i went to integrated schools. i lived in an integrated neighborhood. my friends were both white and black, all through school. it disturbed my mother and it disturbs me that people in the south had problems, they could not live the life that i lived. we dined at lunch counters and took public transportation in contrast to what you heard about rosa parks and others. we rode on the bus -- it was called the dsr then. and we would ride wherever we wanted to go and sit wherever we wanted to sit. coming to the march for us meant supporting the travesties that were happening in the south. and not just my mother and i, obviously. 250,000 people felt the same way. those that could get there. there were many who watched from their tv's at home that felt the same wa
we created a rainy day fund. i bet detroit wishes we had done what we had done in those years. putting billions dollars aside. those are things i worked with the mayor on and i'm proud of. but i don't agree with the mayor on everything. two years ago when he wanted to lay off 4,100 school teachers, all of my democratic opponents, they opposed that, like i did, but i'm the person who got those layoffs stops, and more recently, when the mayor wanted to put in place a homeless policy that i think quite frankly was cruel, i stopped it from happening by going to court. so when i can agree and work with the mayor or anybody quite frankly, i'm going to do it. when i can't, i'm not going to. i think the idea of having a government where you have to agree all the time or never, we have a place like that. it's called washington. and nothing happens. >> kind of a boutique issue in new york with the carriage horses. overall, there's a group for everything. >> you have a carriage horse actually. >> yes, i do. anyhow, that's a different story. there's a group called quinn hates animals. so
, the epa, the irs, the justice department to go on and on and on. it's like they want us to be detroit. we didn't vote for him. he got no votes from the state, thank you, oklahoma. but we are paying for it. and he doesn't end run around everybody. what can we do to get oklahomans working, to get these things implemented without him sitting up there and saying, this is what you're going to do, instead of the people that own this country telling them? [applause] >> you know, i would kill you don't blame it all on obama because they were uncontrolled bureaucracies under george bush. i expense them, and he did, too. he goes back to the thing we kind of started out with, is the federal government is out of control. but it's been predicted by all the historians that our republic will fail. so the question is how do we cheat history? how do we go back? how do we really base -- we embrace the things that made america great. as i said earlier i think we have to get in charge. i've been working for nine years to try to make a big difference. i have made a small difference, not a bi big difference. b
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)